Jeremy Corbyn Denounces Bullying At Westminster As “Nasty” And “Abuse Of Power”
a large number of staff members, women, in particular, feel they have no protection from the small minority of MPs who might harass, bully or wish to take advantage of them.

Labour Leader has condemned bullying at Westminster as “an abuse of power” by the manager or employer and called for allegations to be independently investigated.

The comments came after the Speaker of the House of Commons and other senior MPs have been accused of bullying staff in Parliament and failing to tackle a “culture of fear” among officials.

A female staff who suffered post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after she worked for John Bercow, the Speaker of the House of Commons since June 2009, cited witnesses who saw him undermine and shout at her, BBC Newsnight revealed.

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Kate Emms, Bercow’s former private secretary, left her post after less than a year as the Commons authorities were told she suffered PTSD.

“The culture of bullying is totally wrong in any workplace or any environment,” Jeremy Corbyn said after a speech at Scottish Labour’s conference in Dundee: “It’s nasty, it’s horrible to the individual victim concerned. It’s an abuse of power by the manager or employer.”

Paul Farrelly, the Labour MP for Newcastle-under-Lyme and the Conservative MP Mark Pritchard were also named in a BBC Newsnight investigation, although All three have denied any wrongdoing.

Asked whether he should take action against Farrelly, Corbyn replied: “Obviously the investigation must take place first. If there’s proof of bullying then appropriate reprimands have to take place.”

Read More: Westminster Sex Scandal: Tory MP Roger Gale Says “Female Journalists Are Responsible”

Labour’s Jess Phillips and Green Party co-leader Caroline Lucas, said more must be done to tackle the “club of privilege” in Westminster.

Lucas told the BBC’s Today Programme that levels of bullying in the Commons goes way beyond anything that would be unacceptable “in any other workplace”.

“My career at the House of Commons didn’t end when I was sexually harassed. My career ended when I complained.” one woman, who has now left the House, told the BBC.

As sexual harassment and bullying allegations swept through Westminster, according to one staff, there was a “culture of fear in the House”, as people worry that, if something happens, they will not be looked after.

Later, Bercow reportedly apologised to two members of Parliamentary staff, known as Clerks, including a postman, after they complained following angry outbursts on the phone.

One source who did not want to be named told The Daily Telegraph: “He had a reputation for being unkind and bullying people who worked in his office, even very senior staff did not enjoy working with him.”

According to the BBC interviews with House current and departed staff, a large number of staff members, women, in particular, feel they have no protection from the small minority of MPs who might harass, bully or wish to take advantage of them.

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