“War Risks Killing Entire Generation Of Yemen’s Children”; Charity Warns 5.2 Million Yemeni Children Are At Risk Of Famine

UK-based charity Save the Children has warned Wednesday that an additional one million Yemeni children are at risk of famine as prices of food and transportation rise in the war-torn country, bringing the total number to 5.2 million .

Following the Saudi-led coalition’s offensive on Red Sea port of Hodeida on Tuesday, the charity said that further damage to or the closure of this vital harbor could “cause starvation on an unprecedented scale.”

According to UAE State media, Saudi-coalition launched a series of attacks on the port yesterday, raising fears of a humanitarian crisis for 8.4 million people already struggling to survive following the four-year-old war. Almost 80 per cent of humanitarian assistance passes through the Hodeida port.

Read More: 40 Yemeni Children Buried Side By Side; New Victims Of Saudi Arabia And Its Allies’ Atrocity

Chief executive of Save the Children International, Helle Thorning-Schmidt, said she visited a hospital in north Yemen in which the babies were “too weak to cry.”

“Millions of children don’t know when or if their next meal will come. In one hospital I visited in north Yemen, the babies were too weak to cry, their bodies exhausted by hunger. This could be any hospital in Yemen,” said Thorning-Schmidt, the former Prime Minister of Denmark.

She added: “What happens in Hodeidah has a direct impact on children and families right across Yemen. Even the smallest disruption to food, fuel and aid supplies through its vital port could mean death for hundreds of thousands of malnourished children unable to get the food they need to stay alive,”

Tamer Kirolos, Save the Children’s Yemen Country Director, also warned that even “the smallest” disruption to food, fuel and aid supplies through the Hodeida port could mean “death for hundreds of thousands of malnourished children unable to get the food they need to stay alive.”

Any damage to or a blockade of the vital port as a result of the war could drive up the price of fuel, and as a result transport, to such an extent that civilians can’t even afford to take their sick children to the hospital, Kirolos said.

Sending
User Review
0 (0 votes)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

14 − = 6